Three local veterans to receive Quilts of Valor

Pfc. Wilbur G. Griffitts

Pfc. Otto Frevert Jr.

F2C Raymond J. Faubion

Three veterans will receive Quilts of Valor at the Memorial Day Service hosted by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the American Legion this Sunday, 2 p.m., on the south side of the courthouse in Fayette.

Pfc. Wilbur G. Griffitts

Pfc. Griffits was inducted into the United States Army on June 11, 1944, at Jefferson Barracks in Missouri. After training at Fort Riley, Kansas and North Camp, Hood Texas, he joined the 107th Mechanized Cavalry Reconnaissance Regiment. One of Wilbur’s memories is of sailing by the Statue of Liberty on New Year’s day 1945. Arriving at Laharve, France he spent time at Camp Lucky Strike until supplies and equipment arrived. From there he moved to Saint Nazaire at the mouth of the Loire River near the enemy submarine base and transferred to the 103rd division of the 7th Army. During his service he participated in the Northern France campaign, Central Europe and Rhineland campaigns. Pfc. Griffits was honorably discharged at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma in January 1946 having received the WWII Victory medal, European African Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon, American Theater Ribbon and three Battle Stars.

Pfc. Otto Frevert Jr.

Pfc. Otto Frevert was inducted in the United States Army on May 22, 1944, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. As a member of Company l of the 10th Infantry he was deployed to Europe in November 1944 and saw action in the Ardennes, Rhineland battles and throughout Central Europe, including the infamous Battle of the Bulge. He was honorably discharged in July 1944 having received the American Theater Ribbon, European African Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon with three Bronze Stars, WWII Victory Medal, Good Conduct Medal, an Overseas Bar, Rifle MM in July 1944 and the Combat Infantry Man Badge.

F2C Raymond J. Faubion

F2C Faubion enlisted in the United States Navy on March 10, 1943. Following training he was assigned to the Troop Ship USS President Hayes which participated in the battles of Bougainville, Guam, and Leyte. His assignment was on a landing craft that took the troops to shore during the invasions. Raymond manned the only gun on board, a 30-caliber machine gun. The crew of three on the craft were classified as “expendable.” He cites Guam as his most dangerous and horrific battle. In Raymond’s own words – “delivering those brave young men to shore and seeing so many of them killed before they walked from the water to the shore is something I will never forget.”

Raymond was reassigned to the USS Walter X. Young, a Destroyer Escort and the smallest ship in the US fleet. This ship was the first into the North Sea of Japan and carried an underwater demolition crew. Their orders were to destroy the mines in the North Sea and declare it safe for the USS Missouri and the other ships accompanying the Missouri for the signing of the peace treaty. Raymond felt very proud and blessed for his ship to be present for the signing. Honorably discharged on March 10, 1946, he was recognized for exceptionally meritorious service in action against enemy Japanese aircraft, shore batteries, submarines and mines in the South Pacific campaigns and was awarded ribbons for the Guadalcanal-Tulagi landings – August 1943; consolidation of the Southern Solomons – June 1943; the Night of Torpedo Action off Malaita – 1943; the Battle of Rendova – June 1943; the Battle of Bougainville – November 1943; the landing at Guam – July 1944; and the landing at Leyte – October 1944.

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